Two Different Birds Deliver a Lesson for Me and Others

A couple of weeks ago, an Anna’s Hummingbird showed up at the feeder at a friend’s house in Edgemont Highlands. This bird is common in “open-wooded or shrubby areas and mountain meadows along the Pacific coast from British Columbia to Arizona.” (Wikipedia) The only other reported sighting of an Anna’s in my area was in 1970! On Monday evening, I was able to photograph the bird even though the light was low.

Anna's Hummingbird, Calypte anna, La Plata County, Colorado, USA, North America
Anna’s Hummingbird, Calypte anna, La Plata County, Colorado, USA, North America
Anna's Hummingbird, Calypte anna, La Plata County, Colorado, USA, North America
Anna’s Hummingbird, Calypte anna, La Plata County, Colorado, USA, North America

Anna's Hummingbird, Calypte anna, La Plata County, Colorado, USA, North America

Anna's Hummingbird, Calypte anna, La Plata County, Colorado, USA, North America

 

Two days after I photographed the Anna’s and just after we’d finished a bird walk, a birder called me to say she had found a Chestnut-sided Warbler. This bird breeds in eastern North America and in southern Canada westwards to the Canadian Prairies. There had only been two other reported sighting of a Chestnut-sided Warbler in La Plata County until this one. I drove and then hiked to where Susan was still monitoring the bird. Eventually, it showed up again and I was able to get some good photos in good light. It really pays to keep a camera in a daypack.

Chestnut-sided Warbler 4088W1C
Chestnut-sided Warble, Setophaga pensylvanica, La Plata County, Colorado, USA, North America
Chestnut-sided Warbler 4087W1C
Chestnut-sided Warble, Setophaga pensylvanica, La Plata County, Colorado, USA, North America
Chestnut-sided Warbler 4082W1C
Chestnut-sided Warble, Setophaga pensylvanica, La Plata County, Colorado, USA, North America

What is interesting is that those two very rare birds to our area – one from the West Coast and the other from the eastern US – showed up within a few days of each other. Why? Could it be global climate change?

Whatever the reason, I love these two birds and feel a kinship with them. Whether they know it or not, they are explorers and pioneers. Seekers. Risk-takers. Perhaps lonely – and maybe because of it – they are adventuresome. They are willing to strike out from what is normal and explore new territories and distant horizons. We could all stand to learn to live a bit more like these beautiful birds.

2 thoughts on “Two Different Birds Deliver a Lesson for Me and Others”

  1. I just love it when a bird decides to be adventurous and takes a left turn that brings them to a new area that I happen to be in. I think of them as gifts and count my blessings that I was able to get to see such a wonderful creature that shouldn’t be here.

    Yes, taking the occasional left turn, be brave and adventurous you never know not only are you enriching your life, but you may also be enriching someone else’s or filling a need for someone. Helping Angels come in all sorts of packages and forms I believe.

    You had one with this wonderful, beautiful bird.

    It’s so wonderful to see you posting and digging into your archives to share lovely images, and experiences. I’ve missed your posts.

    Liked by 1 person

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